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Engaging multilevel stakeholders in an implementation trial of evidence-based quality improvement in VA women’s health primary care

The Veterans Health Administration (VHA) has undertaken primary care transformation based on patient-centered medical home (PCMH) tenets. VHA PCMH models are designed for the predominantly male Veteran population, and require tailoring to meet women Veterans’ needs. We used evidence-based quality improvement (EBQI), a stakeholder-driven implementation strategy, in a cluster randomized controlled trial across 12 sites (eight EBQI, four control) that are members of a Practice-Based Research Network. EBQI involves engaging multilevel, inter-professional leaders and staff as stakeholders in reviewing evidence and setting QI priorities.
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The importance of symbolic and engaged participation in evidence-based quality improvement in a complex integrated healthcare system: response to “The science of stakeholder engagement in research”

In this commentary, we respond to the commentary provided by Goodman and Sanders Thompson regarding our paper on multilevel stakeholder engagement in a VA implementation trial of evidence-based quality improvement (EBQI) in women’s health primary care. We clarify our overall approach to engagement (comprised of both symbolic and engaged participation, according to the authors’ classification rubric), highlighting that symbolic participation is of more import and value than the authors suggest, especially in the context of a hierarchical healthcare system.
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The science of stakeholder engagement in research: classification, implementation, and evaluation

In this commentary, we discuss the science of stakeholder engagement in research. We propose a classification system with definitions to determine where projects lie on the stakeholder engagement continuum. We discuss the key elements of implementation and evaluation of stakeholder engagement in research posing key questions to consider when doing this work.
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Active involved community partnerships: co-creating implementation infrastructure for getting to and sustaining social impact

Active involved community partnerships (AICPs) are essential to co-create implementation infrastructure and translate evidence into real-world practice. Across varied forms, AICPs cultivate community and tribal members as agents of change, blending research and organizational knowledge with relationships, context, culture, and local wisdom. Unlike selective engagement, AICPs enable active involvement of partners in the ongoing process of implementation and sustainability.
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Fostering integrated approaches to dissemination and implementation and community engaged research

Since 2006, NIH has supported the burgeoning field of D&I science through program announcements to support research projects, an annual conference, and, more recently, an annual training series. Over the last decade, NIH investments have advanced our understanding of the processes, facilitators, and barriers involved in this translation into real world practice.
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